5.24.2013

life update

Life on the farm recently has been full and lively.  We are "in the thick" of planting season, which means that dad is spending hours in the fields, getting the crops in.  There's also plenty of work to be done on the lawn and in the gardens.  Many wonderful friends have visited this month (with some more dear ones arriving this evening).  Plans for a two-month trip are in the works, with scheduling, packing, cleaning, and cooking to be done in preparation.  In the midst of it all, we make memories as a family.  Some of my favorite memories are never captured on camera or recorded in words.  A few from this month:
-laughing so hard together while cleaning the bus late at night
-sitting in the living room together, buried in our books (this was my activity of choice for my birthday....so fun and rare!)
-racing with our cleaning responsibilities in the house (the girls)
-eating meals together.  It doesn't happen every meal, but I'm grateful for a family that often shares home-cooked meals around a big table.

And now, here are a few pictures from the past few weeks, mostly photos of work around the farm:
 Josh running the skid-loader.  
 these are two of the adorable kittens from the latest batch of kittens on the Bontrager Farm
 Carson loves mechanics so much that he recently bought an old fourwheeler to fix up in his spare time.  I don't quite get what's so fascinating for him about engines and parts.  Maybe it's kinda like me and cooking?  Only instead of messing around with food ingredients and recipes, he's working with nuts and bolts and engines and stuff.
 Little Miss Rebecca makes a lovely grilled strawberry/cheese sandwhich.
 Mother was gone the other weekend so one day for lunch we ate around our kitchen island.  We can only eat there when several people are gone, and with mother + some of the guys gone, we fit! Goblets with yummy beverage upped the "amazing" factor of a lovely spring lunch.  Of course the whoopie pies and grilled sandwhiches were quite scrumptious, too.

Typical life on the farm often involves very untypical happenings. =) You never know what is going to go wrong...
In the above situation...our vet came out and three of the boys are helping him with a procedure for one of our cows that had developed a twisted stomach. The twisted stomach resulted in lots of issues for the cow, unfortunately, so it had to be fixed.
The remedy? Flip the cow over on its back, and then make an incision in the stomach and literally "flip" the stomach. It sounds impossible but it works.

Taylor hanging on for dear life!!

We had friends visiting that evening so they got to watch.
Its always fun to have company here when we have farm stuff going on because then our company can get in on a few of the things farmers do and experience the true life on a farm!
{note: for those of you who are thinking that we are a bunch of crazy country folks that just abuse our animals with torturous procedures, you couldn't be further from the truth.You are just a little ignorant, so let me enlighten you. This cow would have died from a bloated stomach if something hadn't been done. And this is the procedure that works! She was injected with pain killer prior to the surgery so it really wasn't as painful as it appears. Just for the record}
 Denver l o v e s our big rider lawn mower!  
Taylor did a great job cleaning the porch.

"And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men."
Colossians 3:23
posted by chelsy & allison

5 comments:

  1. Looks like ya'll are having a good spring! How exciting about planning a two month long trip. Where are ya'll going? Also, those kittens have to be the cutest things ever. I think we're getting more in a week or two.

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  2. Let me guess...is the two month trip the Alaska one?
    ~Jessica

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  3. I love, love, love, these pictures! We don't see many pictures of the farm work, so they were especially exciting. :-) Thank you!

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  4. The picture of the cow with a twisted stomach brought some memories back from 10 yrs ago when our family lived on a dairy farm. Yup, those things do happen!!

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  5. Amazing to see that what you did has saved that beautiful animals life!
    Sadly, these days people are more and more sending stricken cows to market (no matter how low the profit might be) or putting it down. All because it is less of a bother and cheaper.

    Blessings to all of you.

    Elizabeth

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